Event

April 6: Science for Peace: Windows of Opportunity: How Women Seize Peace Negotiations for Political Change

Perhaps of interest to HAT members.  Free program:

Science for Peace: Windows of Opportunity: How Women Seize Peace Negotiations for Political Change
Please join us for a free public lecture on Wednesday April 6th from 7-9pm in Room UC 144 of University College ( 15 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 3H7 ) at the University of Toronto’s St George campus:
Dr. Miriam Anderson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration and a member of the Yeates School of Graduate Studies at Ryerson University. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge (2010) in Politics and International Studies, an MA in Political Science (2004) from the University of British Columbia, and a BA in International Relations from the University of British Columbia.

Dr. Anderson researches peace processes, post-conflict reconstruction, and transnationalism in war and peace. She currently holds (as the principal investigator) a SSHRC Insight Development Grant entitled “Sustaining Women’s Gains Made During Peace Negotiations” (2014-2016) and a SSHRC Connection Grant (2014-2015), “Transnational Actors in War and Peace.
Miriam Anderson teaches courses on women, war and peace; global governance; and women and politics.

From 1999-2002, Anderson served as a human rights monitor for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in Croatia. During this period she also monitored elections in Bosnia-Herzegovina and in Croatia for the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). Anderson has also volunteered with grassroots organizations in Nicaragua and El Salvador.
This event is part of a weekly series of talks entitled: “Vital Discussions of Human Security”. Please see www.scienceforpeace.ca/events for details on all of our upcoming events. Please see our YouTube channel for videos from past events.

Panel discussion: Limitations on Freedom of Speech

The group Why Should I Care is holding a discussion titled "Limitations on Freedom of Speech"
When: Wednesday, March 4th, 7:30-9:00. (Doors open at 7:00)
Where: The Rose and Crown, 2335 Yonge St.
Toronto Star’s Public Editor Kathy English, and Katie Gibbs, Executive Director of Evidence for Democracy, will discuss the challenges of protecting free speech, when it’s best to stay silent, and some of the free speech-related conflicts happening in the world today.
Admission is free but organizers request RSVP: see their website here.

This is not an HAT event, and is listed for informational purposes.

Clergy Project, September 27

Due to unforeseen circumstances Catherine Dunphy's talk is cancelled, with apologies for the late notice.

HAT's next monthly speaker will be
Catherine Dunphy
speaking about&nbsp
The Clergy Project
Saturday, September 27th, 1:30-3:00 (note change of date)
OISE (252 Bloor St. W.), Room 3-311

Speaker: Catherine Dunphy - A humanist, atheist and former Roman Catholic student chaplain, Catherine is a founding member of The Clergy Project and former Executive Director. She is the Operations Manager for Rational Doubt, a blog on Patheos – www.patheos.com/blogs/clergyproject,  and she is currently writing a book about the founding of The Clergy Project and her experience of losing her faith in seminary.
Topic: The purpose of The Clergy Project is to provide a safe haven for active and former professional clergy/religious leaders who do not hold supernatural beliefs. It originated from a growing awareness of the presence of these professional clergy and a concern about their dilemma as they moved beyond faith. Catherine’s talk will be of interest to anyone who faces or has faced a similar dilemma. 

The Science of Shakespeare (talk by Dan Falk)

The Humanist Association of Toronto presents
"The Science of Shakespeare"
by Dan Falk, HAT Humanist of the Year for 2013
Saturday, June 21, 2013, 1:30-3:00 PM
Location: OISE (252 Bloor St. W.), Room 4-414

William Shakespeare lived at a remarkable time -- a period we now recognize as the beginning of the Scientific Revolution. New ideas about the human body, the earth and the universe were transforming Western thought. Award-winning journalist Dan Falk will explore Shakespeare's interest in the scientific discoveries of his time -- asking what he knew, when he knew it and how that knowledge is reflected in his work.

Dan Falk has written for Smithsonian, New Scientist, Astronomy, Sky & Telescope, The Walrus and many other publications, and is the author of two previous popular science books, In Search of Time and Universe on a T-Shirt. He has been a regular contributor to "Ideas" on CBC Radio, and has won several international awards for his radio documentaries. He lives in Toronto.

All are welcome **** Free admission

Gail McCabe to appear on Zoomer TV, March 17 - INVITATION TO ATTEND taping MARCH 12!

Gail McCabe to appear on Zoomer TV March 17

Gail McCabe, spokesperson for the Ontario Humanist Society and the Humanist Association of Toronto, will appear on The Zoomer, as part of a panel debating the concept of the “Afterlife.” The show includes interviews and panel discussions focusing on topics of interest to Zoomers (the 50+ set). The program is hosted by Conrad Black and Denise Donlon.

The show airs on a weekly basis on Mondays at 9:00 pm. Gail will appear on the March 17th edition

The taping of the Zoomer show on March 12th will take place at 64 Jefferson Avenue in Liberty Village (3 blocks east of Dufferin south of King Street). You are all invited to attend and to join the audience for a cocktail and canape get-together at 3:30 or 3:45 pm that day.
From Zoomer TV:
Despite a rise in secularism, 70% of Canadians (63% of Zoomers 55+) believe in life after death. The question of what happens to us after corporeal death is a hot topic with a glut of media detailing near death experiences as well as contact with guardian angels

in times of duress. But what is behind this new compulsion to believe?

And how does this belief differ from traditional belief systems? However comforting it might be, some traditionalists criticize “new agers” for adopting a convenient spirituality that isn’t subject to an omniscient authority figure

But, even the Vatican is taking heed, appointing Fr. Renzo Lavator as its “angelologist”. He says angels are “back in fashion” thanks to New Age religions but forget old images of cherubic, harp-playing winged beings. Today’s angel is merely a shard of light, not so much seen as felt.

Still, exactly what happens after we expire is hotly debated among true believers, new age spiritualists, agnostics and atheists. And, if the afterlife does exist, it’s not clear what those on the other side are trying to tell us, if anything at all.

Wherever we stand on the belief-o-meter, one thing’s for certain: death and what happens after can have a profound impact on how we live our lives today.